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Thread: Stonechat (female)

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    Default Stonechat (female)

    Stonechat (female)...

    EXIF: Nikon D90, Nikkor 300mm f4 + 1.4x TC, f5.6, 1/1250 sec , ISO 320, Aperture Priority, Matrix Metering
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    The eye contact is nice. The image is saturated and that can be reduced. The blacks have lost details. This looks like a very large crop and some amount of pixellation can be seen in the background. For such a scene to work we need the habitat to be in focus. It doesn't work well with blurred backgrounds. Thanks for sharing.

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    Nice catch light and good eye contact. Wish it was closer for more details. Thanks for sharing.
    Regards,
    Mrudul Godbole

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    Thank you for valuable feedback. Yes, this is a cropped image. I am attaching the uncropped / unprocessed version here. If you can help by working on this image then it will help me understand how to go about Photoshopping I will keep the points in mind next time I get such opportunity.
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    Question Please have a look at my query...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bhavin Ashar View Post
    Thank you for valuable feedback. Yes, this is a cropped image. I am attaching the uncropped / unprocessed version here. If you can help by working on this image then it will help me understand how to go about Photoshopping I will keep the points in mind next time I get such opportunity.
    Please have a look at my query...

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    I don't teach photoshop. Any young kids working in web-designing have those skills. If all you want to learn is photoshopping, then what is the difference between photographers and others?

    It is a tribute to the modern high megapixel cameras that you are able to crop so much. The bird in the frame is tiny and still you want to crop it and show it big. That will ensure loss of details.

    People often ask me from how far I can shoot, when they see my long lens. I tell them that the camera and lens is not like a sniper rifle that you can fire from several kilometers. Your lens will give you good results if the subject is within its range. Remember the famous words of Robert Kapa "if your images are not good enough, then you are not close enough". No amount of post processing can help in creating a great image after massively cropping an image. Also, the long distance will reduce the quality due to haze, and often heat waves.

    Having said that, you have to realise the strength of your equipment and shoot within that. In the image you have posted, it shows the habitat. Unfortunately, the habitat is not well detailed as you have used f5.6. If you would have used a narrow aperture like f8-f9, then more areas would have been within the depth of field. Having said that you still need to be close to the subject.

    Creating environmental compositions is not easy. So you can put in an effort to master it. Just take it as a task that for the next one month everything that you will click will be wider in composition at f8 or f9 and as close to the subject without cropping. We don't improve unless we challenge ourselves.

    The bird is at the centre of the frame. That makes the image static. Moving the camera a bit to the left would have helped in a more off centre composition. Also less space at the bottom and more at the top would have strengthened the scene.

    And lastly, before clicking we need to think as to why we are attracted to the scene. Or what part of the scene we are attracted. If you like the scene, then proceed to photograph it and use the settings accordingly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sabyasachi Patra View Post
    I don't teach photoshop. Any young kids working in web-designing have those skills. If all you want to learn is photoshopping, then what is the difference between photographers and others?
    Agree...I always used to wonder in the old days when people used film cameras there was not this much scope for post processing as far as flexibility is concerned but still people were taking brilliant photographs even then. I think this thinking of how to post better pics has led to significant amt of post processing.

    It is a tribute to the modern high megapixel cameras that you are able to crop so much. The bird in the frame is tiny and still you want to crop it and show it big. That will ensure loss of details.

    People often ask me from how far I can shoot, when they see my long lens. I tell them that the camera and lens is not like a sniper rifle that you can fire from several kilometers. Your lens will give you good results if the subject is within its range. Remember the famous words of Robert Kapa "if your images are not good enough, then you are not close enough". No amount of post processing can help in creating a great image after massively cropping an image. Also, the long distance will reduce the quality due to haze, and often heat waves.
    very well said...I always used to wonder as to why images are looking whiteish! hence when I post process, I try to remove that haze and in doing so invariably lose the quality. One more disadvantage of shooting from distance is that as I am using only the center AF point, it misses the subject many times as it has to focus on such a tiny thing!

    Having said that, you have to realise the strength of your equipment and shoot within that. In the image you have posted, it shows the habitat. Unfortunately, the habitat is not well detailed as you have used f5.6. If you would have used a narrow aperture like f8-f9, then more areas would have been within the depth of field. Having said that you still need to be close to the subject.
    yes..after reading through your comments I second that my intentions of cropping are to show the tiny bird big enough ! I will try to put your advice in practice.

    Creating environmental compositions is not easy. So you can put in an effort to master it. Just take it as a task that for the next one month everything that you will click will be wider in composition at f8 or f9 and as close to the subject without cropping. We don't improve unless we challenge ourselves.
    yes...I will try to implement this. The thing that bothers me is that with this restriction, I probable will be able to shoot only in very good lighting conditions.

    The bird is at the centre of the frame. That makes the image static. Moving the camera a bit to the left would have helped in a more off centre composition. Also less space at the bottom and more at the top would have strengthened the scene.
    The reason for this is that I use only the centre focus point and while trying to recompose I lost many opportunities. But I will challenge myself to take better composed shots right out of the dslr.

    And lastly, before clicking we need to think as to why we are attracted to the scene. Or what part of the scene we are attracted. If you like the scene, then proceed to photograph it and use the settings accordingly.
    Thank you Sabyasachi for taking time to criticise my work. I believe this is the best way to learn from one's mistakes. I appreciate your advice. Thank you.

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    When we push ourselves, we learn to innovate. If shutter speed is less, then you need to look for some kind of stable support. Keep your camera on tripod, monopod, bean bag, rest it on a tree etc etc. The National Geographic selects the best images to publish in their magazine and generally it is about 1 or 2 out of every two thousand images taken by their staff photographers. There are some extremely talented photographers working as staff photographers. They amount of time they take to plan and execute a shot is also to be seen to be believed. Just by clicking anything and everything and then trying to fix it in photoshop will never result in such great quality.

    In my first job in Tata Motors, the greatest lesson that we learnt is to get it right the first time as no amount of rework can give you the same quality.

    When we were shooting with slides, the exposure had to be spot on. Today you can pull and push the raw files a lot. Unfortunately, the amount of time people spend in processing images, if they would have spent that much amount of time learning the theories and putting those into practice, then the images would have shone without the need of extensive post processing. Our best images don't even require more than a minute of processing work. Delete the rest, because over a period of time you will only be storing more of junk and will spend a lot of time searching through these images.

    It is all about fixing benchmarks or goals for ourselves and striving hard to achieve it. Push yourself hard and within a year you will see your quality of images increase manifold.

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