w w w . i n d i a w i l d s . c o m
home
about Sabyasachi Patra
diary
forums
image gallery
contact IndiaWilds
Home
About
Diary
Forums
Gallery
ContactUs

User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Simlipal: April 1980: I heard that Wild Dogs are not seen now a days.............

  1. #1
    Join Date
    27-05-11
    Location
    Salt Lake, Kolkata
    Posts
    4,414
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    12 Thread(s)

    Default Simlipal: April 1980: I heard that Wild Dogs are not seen now a days.............

    Practika LTL, Image 200mm f 3.5 Scanned The Image is for record purpose only
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    18-09-09
    Posts
    3,609
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    Great to see this sir...to me the image depict the lost glory and the current state of wildlife in simlipal ...almost gone. Im not sure if the reserve has staged a come back in the recent past, but it used to figure in the news for all the wrong reasons... except may be for the melanistic tiger.

    Rgds
    Roopak

  3. #3
    Join Date
    24-11-08
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    15,854
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Rare record from Simlipal. Agree with Roopak's comments. Sabyasachi might be able to tell about the recent sightings as he had visited this place two years back I think. Thanks for sharing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    24-11-08
    Location
    New Delhi
    Posts
    16,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    Great to see wild dog image from Similipal. Where did you click this image? Close to jashipur side?

    The reserve has been lacked strong management in the recent past. There had been a spate of poaching incidents and then in the name of maoists the locals had burnt down the forest department outposts. Many hard growth teak trees were cutoff and sent to Bengal. Animals have been poached. Villagers on the outskirts continue to come to the forests to poach. The cost of meat being Rs. 450/- or so per kg means one small deer weighing 20kg gives them 8000 to 9000 rupees or more.

    There are still villages inside the reserve. Just two days back one village was relocated. Two more villages are still there. Similipal needs strong administration and it would bounce back.

    I had gone there to do a recce as I had wanted to do a big documentary there. However, the situation left me saddened. Will do a documentary there some other time. I live in hope that things will improve.

    Cheers,
    Sabyasachi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    30-08-13
    Location
    Hyderabad
    Posts
    396
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks for sharing a piece of our past (a more sane and serene time than present). Sabya sir has mentioned in one of his articles about Simlipal, how ubiquitous SUVs have become in the area due to profits from these criminal activities.
    I think we have lost, we have gone beyond the 'No Return' line in most of the places and are fast approaching in remaining places. The result of our dwindling collective conscience over the time.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    27-05-11
    Location
    Salt Lake, Kolkata
    Posts
    4,414
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    12 Thread(s)

    Default

    Shri Sabyasachi,
    We got down from State bus at Joshipur at about 3 p.m on 06 April, 1980 ( 8 hrs.journey from Kolkata). Purchased all provisions - rice, dal etc. from nearby market. Night halts at FRH at Joshipur both for onward and return journey.
    Our booking was for Barehapani FRH (2 nights) and Jenabil Loghut (2 nights). Khansama prepared the meals at both FRHs.
    Forest department arranged a jeep for entire tour. Only near Chahala, we saw a few Chitals. Inside the forest we could everyday see Sambar , Barking deer (common), wild pigs, elephants (one young had a broken leg)...We saw pug marks of a tiger in the afternoon on the forest road close to that elephant herd feeding inside.
    Wild Dogs were seen in the afternoon while we were returning to Barehapani or Jenabil in the afternoon; not near Joshipur.
    I always remember the morning melody of Indian Cuckoo (Bou katha kao) at Jenabil and the proof that the tiger is a gentleman (unless a maneater) in Corbett's words.
    Before the return journey we visited the Joshipur Hat and found many species or races of ' Birds capable of imitating sounds' were being sold.
    I think, the forest also suffered when regular tourist flow almost came to a halt after the spread of a dangerous strain of malaria.
    Kind regards, SaktiWild

  7. #7
    Join Date
    06-07-09
    Location
    Coimbatore
    Posts
    301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Saktipada Panigrahi View Post
    Shri Sabyasachi,
    We got down from State bus at Joshipur at about 3 p.m on 06 April, 1980 ( 8 hrs.journey from Kolkata). Purchased all provisions - rice, dal etc. from nearby market. Night halts at FRH at Joshipur both for onward and return journey.
    Our booking was for Barehapani FRH (2 nights) and Jenabil Loghut (2 nights). Khansama prepared the meals at both FRHs.
    Forest department arranged a jeep for entire tour. Only near Chahala, we saw a few Chitals. Inside the forest we could everyday see Sambar , Barking deer (common), wild pigs, elephants (one young had a broken leg)...We saw pug marks of a tiger in the afternoon on the forest road close to that elephant herd feeding inside.
    Wild Dogs were seen in the afternoon while we were returning to Barehapani or Jenabil in the afternoon; not near Joshipur.
    I always remember the morning melody of Indian Cuckoo (Bou katha kao) at Jenabil and the proof that the tiger is a gentleman (unless a maneater) in Corbett's words.
    Before the return journey we visited the Joshipur Hat and found many species or races of ' Birds capable of imitating sounds' were being sold.
    I think, the forest also suffered when regular tourist flow almost came to a halt after the spread of a dangerous strain of malaria.
    Kind regards, SaktiWild
    Dear Sir,
    Great image.
    It is great to note how meticulously you have kept the field notes, which is reproduced after over 3 decades! Field notes are invaluable. With photos to corroborate our observations, it is the best piece of record one can refer to.
    Sadly, the habit of taking field notes is fading fast. Reading through your notes is truly inspiring.
    Thanks for sharing.
    N. Lakshminarayanan

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •