w w w . i n d i a w i l d s . c o m
home
about Sabyasachi Patra
diary
forums
image gallery
contact IndiaWilds
Home
About
Diary
Forums
Gallery
ContactUs

User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Brown fish owl RTR diary Mar-17

  1. #1
    Join Date
    21-08-13
    Location
    Sharjah , UAE
    Posts
    525
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Brown fish owl RTR diary Mar-17

    This one from an old collection.
    A particular one spot where one always likely to find this old wise man of the jungle.
    This one taken with mirror lock technique , since it was late evening after evening safari while we were coming out of the park.
    Canon 500mm f/4 , Canon 7D M II , 1/20 , mirror lock , f/4 , Handheld , ISO-1600.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    24-11-08
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    15,501
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Lovely stare. Good that you got the eyes fully through the leaves. Thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    04-10-17
    Location
    India
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Great shot! What and how is the mirror lock technique exactly works?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    21-08-13
    Location
    Sharjah , UAE
    Posts
    525
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Roshni Patel View Post
    Great shot! What and how is the mirror lock technique exactly works?
    In any SLR camera , whether digital or film, light travels through the lens and is sent to the viewfinder by way of a mirror. When you press the shutter button all the way, the mirror flips up so that the light goes directly onto the image sensor, rather than being diverted to the viewfinder.

    The problem with this system is that when the mirror flips, it causes a small amount of vibration. This vibration may introduce slight blurring in the photo, depending on the shutter speed you select. In general, slower shutter speeds (1/60 second and slower) are most susceptible to mirror-induced blurring, but many landscape and studio still-life photographers use their mirror lock-up feature religiously, no matter what their shutter speeds are, to capture the clearest, sharpest photo.

    To reduce the effect of mirror slap-induced vibration, the camera offers mirror lockup. When you enable this feature, the mirror movement is completed well before the shot is recorded, preventing camera shake.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •