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Thread: Canon announces the New EOS 1D X camera with 3 brains

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    Default Canon announces the New EOS 1D X camera with 3 brains

    Canon has announced its New Canon EOS 1D X Digital SLR camera. This camera merges the Canon EOS 1D series with 1.3 crop cameras (APS-H sensors) and the 1 series Full frame senor cameras.

    Salient Features:
    18 Mega Pixels, 12 frames per second, Full frame CMOS sensor.
    ISO 51200 is the max standard ISO. Expandable to H1 = 102400 and H2 = 204800 ISO
    Pixels are 1.25 micron larger than the Canon EOS 1D Mark IV pixels.
    61 Auto Focus points out of which 21 AF points at the centre are cross type with 5.6 and central 5 AF points are cross type at f2.8.
    Dual Digic 5+ Processors and 1 Digic IV processor for metering
    Replaces the Canon EOS 1D Mark IV and the Canon EOS 1DS Mark III cameras
    Dual CF Card slots
    For Video: 4 GB Limit of videos removed and one can now record 30 minute clip
    Chromatic aberration correction
    Time code sync up to a maximum of 10 cameras
    Built in wired gibabit ethernet LAN so that one can immediately download when shooting in such environment (like offices, Olympics and other events etc)
    Big improvement in Moire
    Availability: March 2012
    Negative: Fixed LCD at the back, ie. LCD at the back can't flip.




    Canon U.S.A. Introduces The New Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR Camera, Re-Designed From The Inside Out

    Featuring a Completely New 61-Point Autofocus, Fast Shooting up to 12 fps, 18-Megapixel Full-Frame CMOS Sensor, Full HD Video Recording and Much More

    LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., October 18, 2011 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, is proud to introduce a completely revolutionized EOS-1D series camera, the Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera.* As the new leader in Canon's arsenal of professional DSLRs, the EOS-1D X will be a high-speed multimedia juggernaut replacing both the EOS-1Ds Mark III and EOS-1D Mark IV models in Canon's lineup. Enhancing the revolutionary image quality of the EOS-1Ds and speed capabilities of the EOS-1D series, the EOS-1D X DSLR features an 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ Imaging Processors, 14-bit A/D data conversion and capable of shooting an incredible 12 frames-per-second (fps). Canon's EOS DSLR cameras and accessories have a long-standing legacy of providing high-quality results to professionals in a wide range of markets, including sports, nature, cinematography, wedding and commercial studios. The addition of this new model will help take this tradition to a whole new level.

    The EOS-1D X announcement comes on the heels of Canon's recent manufacturing milestone with the production of the Company's 50-millionth EOS-series SLR camera in September of 2011. Furthermore, Canon will achieve yet another milestone at the end of this month producing the 70-millionth EF lens.

    "The EOS-1D X represents the re-invention of the EOS-1Ds and EOS-1D series, combining new proprietary Canon technologies with the culmination of customer feedback and requests from the field. We are proud to introduce this camera to the worldwide community of professional photographers and cinematographers with the features and capabilities they need to capture the great moments that display their talent," stated Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies and Communications Group, Canon U.S.A.

    The Camera With Three Brains
    The EOS-1D X features three DIGIC processors, including Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors capable of delivering approximately 17 times more processing speed than DIGIC 4, and a dedicated DIGIC 4 for metering and AF control. In conjunction with the newly developed high-performance 18-megapixel full-frame Canon CMOS image sensor, the Dual DIGIC 5+ processors provide high-speed continuous shooting, lower noise, and a significant increase in data processing speed than previous EOS-1D models. This new level of data processing speed allows the EOS-1D X to perform many functions including chromatic aberration correction for various Canon EF lenses in-camera instead of through post-production software. The DIGIC 4 processor utilizes a new 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor for enhanced exposure accuracy with color and face detection, and works together with the camera's new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF.

    The EOS-1D X employs a completely new imaging sensor, producing the lowest noise of any EOS digital camera to date for stunning portraiture and studio work. The new 18-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor utilizes large pixels - 1.25 microns larger than those in the EOS-1D Mark IV sensor and .55 microns larger than those in the EOS 5D Mark II sensor - together with gapless microlenses to achieve enhanced light gathering efficiency, higher sensitivity and less noise at the pixel level. The new sensor has improved on the already very high signal-to-noise ratio of sensor output of earlier EOS models for outstanding image quality, even in extremely low light. When combined with the Dual DIGIC 5+ imaging processors the results are stunning. The images produced with the EOS-1D X camera's new sensor are so clean that files can easily be up-sized if necessary for even the most demanding high-resolution commercial applications. The EOS-1D X will also feature new Ultrasonic Wave Motion Cleaning (UWMC), Canon's second generation self-cleaning sensor unit, which utilizes carrier wave technology to remove smaller dust particles from the sensor and it includes a new fluorine coating on the infrared absorption glass to help repel dust.

    The low-light capability of the EOS-1D X is evident in its incredible ISO range and ability to photograph in extremely low-light conditions. Adjustable from ISO 100 to 51,200 within its standard range, the new model offers a low ISO 50 setting for studio and landscape photography and two high settings of 102,400 at H1 and 204,800 at H2, ideal for law enforcement, government or forensic field applications.

    New 61-Point High Density Reticular AF
    The EOS-1D X includes a brand new 61-Point High Density Reticular AF, the most sophisticated DSLR AF system Canon has ever released. The 21 focusing points in the central area are standard precision cross-type and effective with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6, depending on the lens in use. The center five points are also high-precision diagonal cross-type points for maximum apertures as small as f/2.8. All 61 points are sensitive to horizontal contrast with maximum apertures as small as f/5.6 and 20 of the outer focusing points function as cross-type points with maximum apertures as small as f/4.0. Other innovations of the new 61-point High Density Reticular AF include expanded AF coverage area, superior focusing precision and low light sensitivity, and greater low-contrast subject detection capability compared to earlier EOS AF systems. (See image below for AF point configuration)




    All AF functions now have their own menu tab for quick and easy access (formerly AF custom functions in previous EOS models). A new AF Configuration Tool allows for customized setting of tracking sensitivity, the acceleration and deceleration of tracking subjects, and AF point auto switching, all of which are easily accessed and adjusted via the new AF menu tab. A built-in Feature Guide advises photographers on which settings to use according to subject matter.

    Similar to the AF point selection options offered in the EOS 7D Digital SLR camera, the EOS-1D X offers six AF point selection modes: Spot, Single Point, Single Point with surrounding four points, Single Point with surrounding eight points, Zone selection and Automatic AF point selection. (See image below AF point selection options.)


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    Default Canon 1D X Press release continued

    EOS iTR AF Intelligent Tracking and Recognition Enhances AF Performance
    The Canon EOS-1D X features incredible new EOS iTR (Intelligent Tracking and Recognition) AF options ideal for wedding and event photography as well as sports and photojournalism. The default AF mode for the EOS-1D X uses phase detection AF information, while a new second option uses Face Detection technology to track recognized faces in addition to color information, ideal when shooting events such as tennis or dancing where facial recognition of the original subject will help keep that person in focus throughout the scene.

    Exposure Control
    For the first time in a Canon DSLR camera, a DIGIC processor is used exclusively with the metering sensor for fast, accurate exposure control. The Canon DIGIC 4 processor takes advantage of the EOS-1D X's 100,000-pixel RGB Metering Sensor and utilizes 252 zones for general metering or 35 zones for low-light metering to help ensure accurate evaluative ambient or flash exposure. The new subject recognition capabilities enhance nearly all of the camera's automatic functions, helping to adjust exposure, autofocus, Auto Lighting Optimizer and Automatic Picture Style to the scene being captured for enhanced image quality.

    Multiple Exposure Modes
    The EOS-1D X is the first EOS Digital SLR to feature Multiple Exposure capability. The camera can combine up to nine individual images into a single composite image, with no need for post-processing in a computer. Four different compositing methods are provided for maximum creative control, including Additive, Average, Bright and Dark. Compositing results can be viewed in real time on the camera's LCD monitor, and there is a one-step Undo command that allows photographers to delete an image and try again if desired. The EOS-1D X's Multiple Exposure mode even allows photographers to specify a previously captured RAW image as the starting point for a new Multiple Exposure composite image.

    Super High Speed Mode
    The Canon EOS-1D X camera breaks new ground in the world of digital SLRs, offering a Super High Speed Mode which increases shooting speeds up to 14 fps at full 18-megapixel resolution in JPEG modei. The new camera is also capable of shooting RAW, JPEG, or RAW+JPEG at speeds up to 12 fps in One Shot AF or AI Servo AF for enhanced performance in sports photography and other applications requiring high-speed digital capture. This new level of performance is made possible by the combination of the EOS-1D X's 16-channel readout CMOS sensor, Dual DIGIC 5+ image processors, and a completely new reflex mirror mechanism that has been engineered by Canon to combine high-performance with exceptional precision and reliability.

    Enhanced EOS HD Video - New Compressions, Longer Recording
    Centered around an all-new full-frame CMOS sensor with larger pixels than those found on the EOS 5D Mark II image sensor, the EOS-1D X utilizes new HD video formats to simplify and speed up post-production work. The two new compression formats offered on the EOS-1D X include intraframe (ALL-i ) compression for an editing-friendly format and interframe (IPB) compression for superior data compression, giving professionals the options they need for their ideal workflow. Answering the requests of cinematographers and filmmakers, the EOS-1D X includes two methods of SMPTE-compliant timecode embedding, Rec Run and Free Run, allowing multiple cameras or separate sound recording to be synced together in post production.

    Canon's all new full-frame CMOS sensor ensures that video footage captured on the EOS-1D X will exhibit less moir than any previous Canon model, resulting in a significant improvement in HD video quality. A desired feature for many documentary filmmakers using Canon DSLRs was to enable recording beyond the four gigabyte (GB) file capacity and the EOS-1D X is the answer. The new camera features automatic splitting of movie files when a single file exceeds 4GB. The new file splitting function allows for continuous video recording up to 29 minutes and 59 seconds across multiple 4GB files; no frames are dropped and the multiple files can be seamlessly connected in post production, providing filmmakers the recording time they want in the same convenient DSLR form factor. The camera records Full HD at 1920 x 1080 in selectable frame rates of 24p (23.976), 25p, or 30p (29.97); and 720p HD or SD video recording at either 50p or 60p (59.94). SD video can be recorded in either NTSC or PAL standards.

    The Canon EOS-1D X also includes manual audio level control, adjustable both before and during movie recording, an automatic setting, or it can be turned off entirely. A wind filter is also included. Sound can be recorded either through the internal monaural microphone or via an optional external microphone through the stereo mic input.

    Enhanced Ergonomics & Optimized Design
    Photographers familiar with Canon's EOS 1D-series of cameras will notice the control configuration of the EOS-1D X takes a different approach to button placement. The re-designed exterior and ergonomic button configuration feels comfortable in your right hand, allowing seamless navigation through menu options.The Live View Button has been conveniently placed near the user's thumb for one-touch switching between Live View and Viewfinder shooting. The Quick Control Button and menu navigation controls will allow users to change camera settings using only their right hand, for fast, simple one-handed control using their thumb on the scroll wheel. The new multi-controller is positioned by the right hand thumb when the camera is held for vertical shooting and enables the same level of control to camera operators when shooting vertically as they have when shooting horizontally. On the front of the camera are four user assignable function buttons, two for vertical shooting and two for horizontal shooting, allowing customizable button control when shooting in either position. The camera also features a level of weather resistance equivalent to earlier professional models such as the EOS-1D Mark IV.

    Canon has answered the request of many professional EOS photographers and incorporated Dual Card Slots into the new EOS-1D X DSLR camera. The dual CF card slots will allow photographers to carry only one memory card format and still achieve instant image back-ups and enhanced storage capacity.

    This camera also features a new shutter design with even greater durability and precision. Rated to 400,000 cycles, the new carbon fiber shutter blades are more lightweight and durable, allowing the EOS-1D X to achieve over 100,000 cycles more than the shutter of the EOS-1D Mark IV. A new shutter motion and new motor help further reduce vibration in the camera. The EOS-1D X also features an electronic first curtain, new to the EOS-1D series DSLRs, for minimal in-camera vibration during image capture.

    Connectivity
    For professional photographers who prefer a wired workflow and transfer system, Canon has included a built-in LAN connection in the EOS-1D X DSLR. The built-in LAN connection features a gigabit Ethernet Jack capable of 1000BASE-T transmission speeds, offering photographers a stable wired connection for ultra-fast data transmission. If the network were to go down, the camera will attempt to resend images until the files are sent. The EOS-1D X also features a direct image transfer function whereby images can be selected for transfer, and only sent once a LAN or USB connection is established.

    Accessories
    Designed exclusively for the EOS-1D X, the new Canon WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter* features wireless LAN support for 802.11n network transfer rates providing users with increased communication speed when compared to previous models. With this new dust and weather resistant model, professionals can synchronize clocks on multiple cameras and use the unit to support linked shooting when utilizing multiple cameras. In addition, Bluetooth-compatible equipment can be easily linked to the device as well.

    The EOS-1D X also offers an optional Canon GP-E1 GPS Receiver*, which can be easily integrated into the camera's body. Powered by the camera, this GPS receiver provides the same weatherproof resistance as the EOS-1D X, even at the connector. With an electronic compass on-board, the GP-E1 will log movement - latitude, longitude, elevation, and the Universal Time Code - and allow viewing of camera movement on a PC after shooting. The receiver will also record camera direction when shooting, even when shooting vertically.

    Pricing and Availability
    The Canon EOS-1D X Digital SLR camera is scheduled for March 2012 availability and will be sold in a body-only configuration at an estimated retail price of $6,800.00. The compact, lightweight WFT-E6A Wireless File Transmitter is scheduled to be available in March 2012 and have an estimated retail price of $600. Availability for the GP-E1 GPS receiver is expected in April 2012 with an estimated retail price of $300.

    About Canon U.S.A., Inc.
    Canon U.S.A., Inc., is a leading provider of consumer, business-to-business, and industrial digital imaging solutions. Its parent company, Canon Inc. (NYSE:CAJ), a top patent holder of technology, ranked fourth overall in the U.S. in 2010, with global revenues of more than US $45 billion and is listed as number five in the computer industry on Fortune Magazine's Worlds Most Admired Companies 2011 list. Canon U.S.A. is committed to the highest levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty, providing 100 percent U.S.-based consumer service and support for all of the products it distributes. At Canon, we care because caring is essential to living together in harmony. Founded upon a corporate philosophy of Kyosei "all people, regardless of race, religion or culture, harmoniously living and working together into the future" Canon U.S.A. supports a number of social, youth, educational and other programs, including environmental and recycling initiatives. Additional information about these programs can be found at Canon U.S.A. : Kyosei: Our Corporate Philosophy. To keep apprised of the latest news from Canon U.S.A., sign up for the Company's RSS news feed by visiting Canon U.S.A. : RSS.

    ###
    * This device has not been authorized as required by the rules of the Federal Communications Commission. This device is not, and may not be offered for sale or lease, or sold or leased, until authorization is obtained.

    Based on weekly patent counts issued by United States Patent and Trademark Office.

    Specifications, price and availability are subject to change without notice.

    All referenced product names, and other marks, are trademarks of their respective owners.

    i Super High Speed Continuous shooting at 14 fps requires mirror lock and JPEG mode at ISO speeds less than 32000.



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    Full frame at 12FPS. That a huge jump compared to the 5dmkII and 1Ds mk III. It uses the new Digic 5 processors which are supposed to be 17x faster than the digic 4s. That is impressive stuff. This will cost a bomb for sure :-)
    Takers anyone?
    Regards,
    Bibhav Behera
    www.bibhavbehera.com

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    Bibhav,
    6800 USD is the estimated retail price. Traditionally the 1DS series is priced around that.

    Considering that the frame rate is such a huge jump over the 5fps of the previous EOS 1DS Mark III, one can really feel impressed by the technology.

    This reminds me of my EOS 1V of the film days.

    Considering that I had filmed gaurs jostling before dawn at 12800 ISO at f2.8 at 400mm, I am wondering how the quality will be at ISO 51200, as that is now the max standard ISO. With larger pixels, the quality should be great. Looks like we are moving towards shooting in the dark.

    It would have been fantastic if Canon would have included a resonable slow motion capability ie. 60fps at 1080p. That would have really helped in capturing action sequences. That's the only thing that is hurting me. Even during the 1D Mark IV video review ( Mark IV Review: Part III Video - Indiawilds: Land of the Tiger. Conservation, Wildlife Photography, Communities ) I had mentioned that. I guess, Canon is saving that for the pure film cameras.

    Have to check how good the video codec is in actual practice. Canon says the new intraframe (ALL-i) video Codec is good with less of compression. That means the file size is higher and better. Have to see whether this codec and compression is approved by BBC and NGC. That will mean a lot for wildlife shooters. Quoting some details about the compression from Canon"
    [QUOTE]
    Compression
    The biggest change to the movie shooting is the ability to choose from two different compression methods — IPB or ALL-I — depending on your needs. The EOS-1D X still records movies using the H.264 codec but it is the compression type within this codec that has been changed.

    When shooting movies, the frames that are captured are usually split into key frames or Intra-Frames and predicted frames. These Intra-frames are used as reference frames to help with compression.

    The first type of compression available is IPB. The B in IPB stands for Bi-directional compression. With IPB differential compression is carried out by predicting the content of future frames, with reference to both previously captured frames and subsequent frames. Like the IPP compression method used in previous EOS DSLRs, some data is stored in a Group Of Pictures (GOP), meaning that frame-by-frame editing will result in lower image quality. When using IPB editing video in-camera to trim clips can only be done in one-second increments.

    The second method of compression is designed for users working in high-end editing systems or those looking for the very highest quality. This compression is called ALL-I. ALL-I stands for ‘Intra-coded Frame' and it differs from IPB and IPP because all frames captured are treated as Intra-frames or key frames. Although each frame is still compressed, there is no further compression as each frame is seen as an individual image.

    When filming with ALL-I, file sizes will be around three times larger than with IPB, and it is easier to edit to an individual frame without degrading the image quality. Despite the extra file size, ALL-I compressed footage actually requires less computer processing power than IPB or IPP and consequently will playback more smoothly on lower specification computers. This is because there is no rendering needed to extrapolate data from the GOPs used in IPP and IPB."

    [UNQUOTE]
    I am surprised that this camera doesn't have a flip LCD screen. So the LCD screen at the back is fixed. The practice of a tilt LCD screen at the back was introduced first in the Canon 60D camera and has not been carried to the 1D X. So for low angle Videos, one has to depend on an external monitor.

    This will be available in March 2012. For a still photographer, this is an absolutely delightful camera. Price is a tough question though if you are not making money from your camera.

    For a filmmaker, this can act as a good tool as a B camera (primarily because of the lack of slow motion at 1080p). Else, this is a great tool.

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    Sabyasachi,

    Did you miss the important point that the outer 20 AF points work at maximum aperture of f4 or am I imagining things?

    Cheers

    Bhargava
    Bhargava

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bhargava Srivari View Post
    Sabyasachi,

    Did you miss the important point that the outer 20 AF points work at maximum aperture of f4 or am I imagining things?

    Cheers

    Bhargava
    I am not sure what to make out of your comment. Whether you are accusing me of ignorance, or trying to tell me something which I am not aware..... frankly speaking I am not sure. The inclusion of the smiley icon further confuses me about your intent.

    In case you need clarity, you may please check the text just above the autofocus image as well as the image showing the auto focus points in boxes clearly marked in different colours.

    Cheers,
    Sabyasachi

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    Default Details about AF System of 1D X

    Some more details about the AF system used in the Canon 1D X

    AF system
    The EOS-1D X features a completely new autofocus system that's designed to provide consistent focusing performance, no matter what the subject is or how bad the lighting conditions may be. Autofocus systems in general have reached a point where they have plateaued in performance. Since they are predictive systems, they have to assume what a subject may do next in order to guess where the focus should be. Unfortunately, this is not possible with subjects that move erratically and is occasionally the cause of missed frames.

    Adjusting the camera AF settings, as is required for optimum performance on the EOS-1D Mark III and EOS-1D Mark IV, is one way to achieve better results. However, this requires knowledge and experience of how the AF system functions to get the very best out of it.

    To achieve the goal of optimum AF in diverse situations and lighting conditions, the EOS-1D X makes use of far more than just an autofocus sensor, as previous cameras have done. Instead data is collected from the 61-point AF sensor, the auto exposure sensors, an AF correction light-source detection sensor and, with certain lenses, a panning detection gyro sensor. While these sensors provide a benefit to One-Shot AF shooting, the major benefit is found with AI Servo, where they can help identify the subject by not only contrast, but also colour. To make AF set-up easier the EOS-1D X also features a simplified AF settings menu where a description and example uses for each function are displayed.



    61-point AF
    The newly designed AF sensor in the EOS-1D X features an increase in AF points from 45 on the EOS-1D Mark IV to 61. Of these 61 AF points, up to 41 of them will function as cross-type sensors that are able to detect contrast both horizontally and vertically. The exact number of cross-type sensors will vary depending on the lens you are using. The spread of AF points is roughly similar to that on the EOS-1D Mark IV but with far more AF points the precision is greater, especially when tracking moving subjects.

    To improve focus accuracy, all 61 AF points feature a dual-line zigzag arrangement, as seen on three AF points within the EOS 7D. This arrangement provides the best aspects of both increased pixel pitch for finer precision and increased AF tracking speed with extra data points, without any of the drawbacks of either solution alone, allowing for both fast and accurate AF.

    Five of the central AF points, arranged vertically down the mid-line of the frame, function as Dual-Cross type AF points with lenses featuring an f/2.8 or faster maximum aperture (as seen on the central AF point of the EOS 7D). This means they are also arranged with a diagonally orientated AF point in an ‘X', plus a conventional horizontally and vertically arranged AF point, like a ‘+', offering increased focus precision.

    With lenses that have a maximum aperture of f/5.6, or faster, the central bank of 21 AF points will all function as cross-type AF sensors, and the left and right banks of 20 AF points each will act as cross-type sensors at f/4 and f/5.6.

    An advantage of the increased focus sensitivity is the ability to detect extreme defocus and correct accordingly. By using the whole AF sensor, where every point is vertical line sensitive at f/5.6 or greater, the lens can be refocused much more quickly than before. As part of this increased sensitivity, the EOS-1D X can now focus in even lower light levels than the EOS-1D Mark IV. Using a single central AF point with an f/2.8 lens, the EOS-1D Mark IV could focus in light levels of EV -1. However, the EOS-1D X is able to focus in EV -2, which is the equivalent of shooting under the light of the full moon.

    The AF Algorithm has also been modified from the one found in the EOS-1D Mark IV. The new AI Servo AF III has been designed using evaluation feedback from professional photographers who have been shooting with the EOS-1D Mark IV; the aim being to provide higher focusing precision and more stable AF tracking. These changes have been incorporated in four ways.

    With a predictive AF system the camera is continuously recording the position of the subject and predicting where it will be for the next frame based on its motion so far. If the camera fails to detect the subject position in one recording period, the negative result is now ignored and the next focus point is based on the previous accurate results. Equally, if you are tracking a moving subject and an object passes between your position and the subject, the camera could become confused and jump to a new focus distance.

    The EOS-1D X will ignore the results when the AF distance appears to jump greatly so that it can continue to track the subject when it reappears from behind an obstacle, based on the results before the obstruction covered the subject. Equally, if there is suddenly a large jump in the focus distance, the camera will not drive the lens to the new distance directly. Instead it will gradually drive the lens focus, based on the previous successful focus distance results.

    The increased sensitivity of the focus system has also allowed for faster predictive focus measurements. In previous EOS cameras there was a warm-up period while the AF system began tracking. This has now been reduced so that the EOS-1D X can begin predictive tracking as soon as a subject begins to move.

    Focusing during panning
    The EOS-1D X features a built-in 2-axis gyro sensor that can detect camera motion both horizontally and vertically. If panning motion is detected, it will stop the AF point switching to a new subject should you pan across an obstacle within the frame during shooting. When using the Mark II super telephoto lenses, such as the EF300mm f/2.8L IS II USM or the EF400mm f/2.8L IS II USM, the camera will use the IS gyro sensor located in the lens, rather than the one located in the camera itself.

    EOS intelligent Tracking and Recognition AF (EOS iTR AF)
    In addition to all the data provided by the AF system, the camera will also make use of data provided by the new AE sensor and AE DIGIC 4 processor to improve focus tracking in AI Servo mode.

    By default, AF systems operate based on contrast detection. They look for contrast and will focus at the area of greatest contrast. However, in some situations, especially with Auto AF point selection, this can lead to the focus jumping from the subject to a different area as the contrast levels change due to changes in lighting. Since the AE system of the EOS-1D X can detect the colour of a subject, this information can be passed to the AF system to improve the tracking.

    By using the colour of the subject that was initially focused, the AF system can track the movement of that subject, both by contrast and colour across the frame, and automatically select the most appropriate focus point given the position of the subject within the frame. This frees you up to concentrate on composing your images rather than selecting the best AF point for focus.

    The system works not only with the colour of subjects but also with faces. Because the AE system can detect the presence of a face within the frame, the subject can be tracked across the frame accurately and quickly without having to change the focus point continually. If there are multiple faces within the frame, then by manually selecting an AF point you can ensure the correct face is focused initially and then tracked in subsequent frames.

    AF modes
    Canon's EOS 7D DSLR featured a comprehensive list of focus point selection methods. It is something that has been well received and much requested on other models. Accordingly, the EOS-1D X features six different AF point selection modes, including Spot AF for all lenses, not just the super telephoto models as on the EOS-1D Mark IV.

    In Single Point AF a single AF point, from the 61 available, is manually selected and used by the camera for focusing. With Auto Selection, the camera will select from any of the 61 AF points available to focus the subject. Single Point Spot AF is the same as Single Point AF, but in Spot focusing, the camera uses a smaller section of the AF sensor to allow you to more precisely place the AF point on the selected subject. This is useful when shooting past obstacles, such as when focusing on a lion lying in long grass. However, Spot AF is not recommended for fast moving subjects or in very low light conditions. When using either of these two options the non cross-type AF points will blink during AF point selection so that you are aware if the AF point you wish to use is a cross-type point or not.

    For more control over tracking moving subjects, there are two AF point expansion settings. In AF point expansion, a single AF point is manually selected and the camera will then use some surrounding points to help to track the subject. The options are either a cross arrangement, with the points immediately above, below, left and right being used, or the surrounding eight points around your manually selected point.

    The final AF selection mode is Zone AF. As on the EOS 7D, this allows you to select one of nine zones. Within the selected zone, the AF points will be chosen by the camera in the same manner as with automatic AF point selection, but the points to choose from are restricted to within that zone area.


    AF Configuration Tool
    Although the AF system in the EOS-1D X is very capable, to ensure that you get the very best from it, it should be tailored to suit the subject you are shooting at the time — especially when that subject is moving. However, achieving this with previous EOS models required an in-depth understanding of how the AF system functions and what it is capable of. With the EOS-1D X, this process has been simplified with AF presets — settings that will get you most of the way towards the appropriate setting, with fine adjustments available thereafter to further tweak the performance to suit your particular shooting style.

    For easier menu navigation and setting, all the AF settings and Custom Functions are now grouped into one menu tab, so there is no need to jump into different menu areas to make changes.

    Within the AF settings there are also some new configuration options. The first of these is Acceleration/Deceleration tracking. This is useful for subjects that change speed, like a racing car. With three setting levels, you can adjust the focus response for greater stability in the AF system. The 0 setting is designed for subjects that don't change their speed much during motion. Settings 1 and 2 are designed for subjects that move suddenly or that accelerate or stop suddenly. They should not be used with smooth moving subjects as it could make the focus more instable for those subjects.

    The second configuration option is for AF point auto-switching. This is used in combination with Auto AF point selection, Zone AF or AF point expansion. It allows you to adjust the speed at which the AF points are changed to track a subject moving across the frame. The default ‘0' setting will allow for gradual AF point change. Selecting ‘1' or ‘2' will gradually increase the speed at which a different AF point is selected.

    These options still require you to understand a bit about your subject, and this is where the preset settings are designed to help. There are six presets designed for different scenarios and, instead of having to remember what each setting does, the camera provides an icon and example usage within the menu display to make selecting the correct option easy.

    The default setting ‘Case 1' is for general purpose shooting. It will provide accurate and fast focus across a wide range of shooting situations. However simply selecting this option for everything will mean you don't make full use of the AF system and, with a little adjustment, you will most likely achieve even better results.

    ‘Case 2' is designed for situations where the subject may move away from the AF point momentarily. The camera will continue to track focus the subject, even if the subject moves away from the AF point or an obstacle momentarily comes between you and your subject. This is useful for subjects such as swimming, freestyle skiing or tennis.

    ‘Case 3' will allow you to instantly focus on subjects that enter the AF point area. It is useful for rapidly locking onto a new subject, or for switching between subjects rapidly. As an example, this would suit alpine skiing or the start of a cycle race where there are several subjects and you may wish to select between them quickly.

    ‘Case 4' is designed for subjects that change speed or direction rapidly, as happens in motorsports or football. The camera will prioritise the speed of tracking to keep up with these changes in speed, even if the focus results suggest it is a very rapid change in focus distance.

    ‘Case 5' is designed for use with automatic AF point selection, Zone AF and AF Point expansion and subjects that move erratically, up and down or left and right. The settings allow the camera to switch AF points rapidly to keep track of the motion. It is most suited to subjects like figure skaters or aerobatic flying displays where erratic motion is likely to be encountered.

    ‘Case 6' is like a combination of both ‘Case 4' and ‘Case 5' and is for subjects that change speed abruptly and move erratically. Like ‘Case 5' it is used with Automatic AF point selection, Zone AF and AF Point Expansion. Even if the subject starts or stops suddenly or makes erratic direction changes, this setting will enable the camera to respond quickly to keep the focus accurately tracked on the subject. This setting is most useful when shooting subjects like basketball or gymnastics, where speed and direction changes are common.

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    Sabyasachi,

    I only intended to crack a joke and somehow it didn't go well I was looking to add on to your elaborate post saying that apart from all 61 points working at f5.6, 20 points work at f4 and 5 points work at f2.8

    Sorry for the confusion.

    Regards

    Bhargava
    Bhargava

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    This appears to be a phenomenal camera. Fantastic low light ability. For the first time one sees 3 brains or sensors in a camera. About Video, I go by Sabyasachi's opinion 12 fps is a lot. Any idea when it will be launched in India? Thanks for sharing such detailed information.
    Regards,
    Mrudul Godbole

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    By the way, I just realised that this camera does not have the ability to auto focus with f8 lenses! So, we don't get to use the 2x extender with f4 lenses or a 1.4x TC with f5.6 lenses! Any thoughts on this as to why canon has decided to skip the feature?

    Cheers

    Bhargava
    Bhargava

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    The AF technology employed in the Canon EOS 1D X is completely different. It uses contrast as well as Colour detection. It even uses face detection. It also uses data from an AF correction light detection sensor (Digic IV) and with the new 400 f2.8 L IS II USM, 500 f4 L IS II USM, 600 mm f4 L IS II USM etc it uses the gyro sensors in the lens. The information from all this is processed in real time to give you a better auto focus than the predictive auto focus technology that was in use earlier. One should remember tha the amount of light at f8 is limited (especially from the light detection sensor). Limiting the AF to f8 is a deliberate move to get the best focus accuracy.

    At the moment the only combinations for f8 were a 2x Tc coupled with an F4 lenses (500mm f4 IS or IS II, 600mm f4 IS or IS II and 400mm f4 DO) or 1.4x TC with 800 mm f5.6 lens. The 2x TC. Any other lens and a 2x will give you lousy results.

    And one should remember that Auto focus at F8 was available with only the 1 Series bodies and that too with the central AF point. So If I have to make a harsh statement, not many of you guys would have used it and hence no point in bothering because of something which you never had. If anyone was using it regularly, then has to think how often it was and whether it was a do or die situation. Nikon guys never had this benefit. However, it is always good to have the ability to AF at f8 so that one can use a 600mm with 2x or 500mm with 2x or a 800mm with 1.4x. So now we have to live with this. If you think this was a must have situation, then better to pick up the 1D Mark IV till it is available.

    I always suggest to use the manual focus to achieve critical focus. The long tele lenses always have the focus override facility so that you can fine tune your focus. I think it is better to use that or live view.

    The only time I had tried using AF at f8 was with a Canon 300mm f4 L IS USM lens and EF 2xII TC and I gave up because I didn't like the overall quality. (I have to hunt where those images are). And That is also one of the reasons for buying the 400mm f2.8 L IS USM lens so that I can use a 2X TC and get 800mm at f5.6 and use all the AF points.

    Shifting from 1.3 crop sensor camera to a Full frame camera will result in your subjects appearing smaller in the frame. And you guys using 1.6 crop cameras like 60D etc, will have difficulty in detecting the subject in a full frame camera. Frankly speaking, I don't expect the photographers who crop massively to post in photosharing sites will find this appealing (apart from the affordability factor).

    The photographer or filmmaker who ever uses this camera will do so in combination with another body to reap the benefits of both.

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    Check this link for some sample images -

    *ヤノン:EOS-1D X|Sample Images & Movie
    Regards,
    Mrudul Godbole

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    I had clicked image and clips of Gaurs jostling with each other before dawn. Here is a black and white image clicked at ISO 12800. Gaur jostling - Indiawilds: Land of the Tiger. Conservation, Wildlife Photography, Communities

    When I check the sample image at ISO 12800 uploaded in the link shared by Mrudul, the 1D X seems to be good. Wish Canon had uploaded a large image for us to view.

    Sabyasachi

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    One of the major headaches that I face shooting video with my Canon EOS 1D Mark IV is that I can't use a wired remote to start and stop video. So I have to be in arms length to click video. This problem has been solved with the new Canon EOS 1D X. The Canon EOS 1D X can start and stop video shooting using a Canon RS - 80N3 remote. That is really cool. Canon seems to be putting lot of thought. If Canon had given 1080p at 60fps, then it would have been really awesome.

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    Canon enables Autofocus at f8.

    Canon has now announced a firmware upgrade for the 1D X camera and has launched the Version 1.1.1 which enables auto focus at f8 and also the ability to highlight or illuminate the AF points during AI Servo AF.
    According to Canon "If AF point expansion is selected with an f/8 maximum aperture lens/extender combination, the four AF points surrounding the center point will act as AF Assist points. This option effectively expands the size of the AF detection area to enhance autofocus performance with subjects that appear small in the viewfinder and difficult to track, such as small animals and birds in flight. AF points above and below the center will be sensitive to vertical contrast, while points to the left and right will be sensitive to horizontal contrast."

    Whereas the ability to AF at f8 was never going to be a problem as I use the 400mm f2.8 L IS USM lens and with 2x it becomes an 800mm f5.6 lens, I was concerned by the AF points not illuminating. While handling a pre-production version, it took me sometime to realise that it was not my mistake but the camera was not having the active AF points illuminating. It was a big change to my style of shooting. Fortunately, Canon has now taken care of both these issues.

    The Firmware can be downloaded from this link: http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consum...OS1DX_firmware

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